FOLLOWING MONEY IN 2016 PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS

Friday, March 4, 2016

56% Of Arizonans Think Supreme Court Vacancy Should Be Filled This Year, Would Blame McCain, Senate Republicans If It's Not; McCain Disapproval Rates Hit All-Time High

A survey of Arizona registered voters show a majority believe the Supreme Court vacancy caused by the death of Antonin Scalia should be filled this year, and would blame Arizona Senator John McCain and Senate Republicans if it is not. McCain is running for re-election this year, and already faces disapproval ratings of 63% - including 53% of Republicans.

The survey was conducted this week by Public Policy Polling on behalf of a Democratic-philic group called Americans United For Change.  The margin of error is 4.2%.

McCain has endorsed the GOP position that the Senate should take no action on anyone nominated by President Barack Obama. 69% of the surveyed Arizonans said "the Senate should wait to see who is nominated to the Supreme Court before deciding whether to confirm that person".  56% of the Republicans participating in the telephone poll gave that answer; only 35% said they should not consider the nomination no matter what.

Two years ago, PPP noted that McCain was "the least popular Senator in the country," with an approval rate of 30% compared to a disapproval rate of 54% (35%/55% among Arizona Republicans).  That negative 24% difference has grown, and in this survey is now negative 37%.

Only 26% of Arizonans approve of McCain's Senate performance. Independents - once a strength for McCain - now approve/disapprove at a 25%/63% rate. Members of his own party are now at 33%/53%.

Although the elevator has been going down, McCain is still greatly favored to survive the August primary against former State Senator Kelli Ward, Alex Meluskey, and others. He is also favored to win in the general election against Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-CD1).


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